Tag Archives: social media

scott marsha kath at CA adv copy

Changing of the Guard at AMP

 Cross-posted here.

Though I’ve really enjoyed my time as AMP’s Social Media Manager, it’s with a heavy heart that I announce my departure from AMP for new ventures.

I’ll still be active in music ed & arts advocacy and marketing (although really, isn’t advocacy and marketing one and the same?), and you can still follow my personal accounts on pretty much every social network ever created, and at kathleenheuer.com. Email me anytime at kathleen@kathleenheuer.com. So I’m really not “going” anywhere. 🙂 Keep an eye out for new stuff from me. #hinthint 

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Pass the TEQUILA: Preventative Medicine for Social Media Meltdowns

Have you suffered a social media meltdown? If you have, you may have needed a good stiff drink (or six!) afterwards. Next time, before you do something you’ll regret with your Facebook marketing, pass the TEQUILA for a strong dose of preventative medicine.

After reviewing the Case of the Pretty Pink Purse, there are a lot of lessons we can learn from this experience. Let’s look at seven of them which might help you through your next social media mishap.

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campbell snake c print satchel

The Case of the Pretty Pink Purse: Advertising Within a Local Facebook Group

As penance a public service, I volunteer as an administrator for a locally-based Facebook group. Today I witnessed a social media meltdown which could have been avoided at several turns. In an effort to help others avoid these pitfalls, I’ll walk through what happened. It’s long, but there are a lot of lessons to be learned (see the bold print). Plus, there are lots of pictures!

The group currently has 4,837 members. That’s more than any of our other local Facebook groups, several of which were started as (angry) spinoffs from this group when members disagreed with admins. Some of the other groups are dedicated to marketing and commerce, both by individuals (flea-market-type groups) and local businesses. As an additional local digital marketing resource, there is also a Facebook interest list to round up all of the local businesses and organizations into one virtual place. Because this group is the largest and most active, however, local businesses have found it the place to be.

Though there are established group guidelines, there had still been some recent discussion over how tightly the reins of the group should be held. What should be the group’s policy on advertising? Should new posts be moderated by the admins, or should members be free to post whatever they like? Should multiple posts on the same topic be edited down? As one might imagine, with a group this size, it is difficult to develop consensus on anything.

Amongst the day’s usual posts about impending weather, local news, and an occasional lost pet, a few local business owners posted about their goods and services. Some businesses post more frequently than others. One local crafter often hawks her wares, including luxury purses, handmade wreaths and decor several times a day.

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Facebook look back

Facebook Look Back: Their Gift to You on their 10th Birthday

Facebook turned ten years old today. Zuck gave us a shoutout:

 

To celebrate, they’re inviting you to take a walk down memory lane: a “look back,” if you will. Here’s what mine looked like; find out how to get yours in the video below.

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workflow

My Social Media Workflow

A while back, I came across this post where Brian Lundin outlined his social media workflow. Social media sites and tools have exploded, and it can be hard to know where to start or what tools are worth their learning curves. In this video, I outline my favorite sources for shareable content, and the trustworthy tools I use to share it.

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diversify

Diversify your posts across social media

The other day I was on LinkedIn and came across this ad:

LI bad tip #7

At first glance, it seems like a really good idea. I mean, why not save the effort and energy, and post the same content across all of your social networks?

If you’re asking someone to put their trust in you enough to follow you on more than one social network, you should reward them by giving them killer content when they arrive. If you’ve posted the same thing across Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and G+, there’s no need for followers to follow you on more than one social network. They know they’ll get the same information by just following you on one.

Your efforts to diversify your content across social networks will pay off. “Arts and cultural organizations that tweet more than four times per day and do not replicate Facebook content on their Twitter feed have more followers and a higher rate of engagement than others.”

Plus, each network has different strengths. Images work great on Facebook or Pinterest. Links work well on Twitter or LinkedIn, but not at all on Instagram.

Sending one generic message out may not be the best use of your efforts.

Beyond that, it makes you and your business appear much less human. Would you rather answer a phone call and talk to your mother, or pick up the phone call to find a generic prerecorded message from your mom sent to you AND your siblings?

Not quite right, is it?

If you’re just starting out on social media, or maybe are short on time or energy, I suppose you can send a content blast across all of your networks (make sure you consider the time and effort involved in maintaining a presence on each network before you jump in with both feet). It’s better to be there and post regularly than not at all. But as you progress with your efforts to conquer the world of social media, start making small efforts to diversity your content streams. It’ll pay off in the end.

Diversity makes the world—online or off—a much more interesting place to be, don’t you think?

diversify