Tag Archives: music education advocacy

State of the Music Program

Give a State of the Music Program Address

Tonight, America prepares to receive the State of the Union address. Both houses of Congress attend, and the speech is broadcast widely. There is much pomp and circumstance. I think our Executive Branch may be onto something. They’re being proactive about spreading their message, not reactive. Think about that, and then consider how we might adapt that idea for music education.

I’d like to propose a “State of the Music Program” address. Once a year, a representative of the music or fine arts department prepares a written (and oral) report and reserves time to present the report to the school board.

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torches and pitchforks

Why We Can’t Let This Jim Rome Thing Slide

 

It was just one tweet. But it soon became the tweet heard ’round the band world.

jim rome screenshot

As the day progressed, the tweet—and the outrage it inspired from band geeks everywhere—picked up steam. #RomeIsBurning, Twitter proclaimed!

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PMP art

Season 1 Finale of Promoting Your Music Program

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This episode of Promoting Your Music Program will be the last for this season. For forever and ever, really.

That’s because when we come back after the holidays, the podcast will have a new name. To learn the details, join my email list here.

Also, I’ll be at Midwest Band & Orchestra Clinic December 17-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago. I’d love to meet up there: Email me!

In the meantime, check out some of my favorite clips from this season:

Erin Fortune, Senior Marketing Coordinator for Music for All

Fran Kick of Kick It In, MFA Summer Symposium Clinician

Seth Williams, Advocacy Coordinator for Music for All

David Vandewalker, author of Boosters to the Rescue!

Reactions to News about The Ohio State University Band with Lisa Salazar and Maria Dripps-Paulson

Facebook Page Post Ideas for your Music Program

Apple event recap + Carolina kicker shoves HS band member

Band kids are the BEST.

Eugene Cantera of the Dallas School of Music

Margaret Bauer of the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association

Education reform: Here’s why I care

Courtney Brandt: Young Adult Author

DJ Corchin of The 13th Chair

Courtney Brandt

Courtney Brandt: Young Adult Author

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On this episode of the Promoting Your Music Program podcast, I’m so excited to speak with  young adult novelist Courtney Brandt. You can find her books here:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

iBooks

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Eugene Cantera of the Dallas School of Music

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Kath and Eugene DSM twitter

Eugene Cantera of the Dallas School of Music:
Are You Making These Common Website Mistakes?

Eugene Cantera is a partner at the Dallas School of Music and a founding member of the dlp Music Program. He serves as the Director of Social Media for both organizations. He is a saxophonist but teaches many instruments and performs in the Dallas area in the rock and jazz genres. Eugene recently returned from an artist in residency at the Wilderness School in Adelaide, Australia where he taught and performed with several ensembles.

Eugene was kind enough to join me on this week’s podcast, where we talked about some tips & tricks to optimize your website and social media. A large percentage of the Dallas School of Music’s clientele is online, so they’ve developed some serious digital chops along the way.

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band students are the best

Band kids are the BEST.

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I’ve long had a sneaking suspicion that band kids are the best. Honestly, there’s just something extra awesome about these kids. This week, a bit more evidence crossed my desk. I make my case in this episode.

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marketing music ed word cloud

Marketing music education

I honestly never thought it would come to this.

If you had told me twenty or even ten years ago that I would have to actively fight to ensure my child access to the same music education I enjoyed, I would have thought you were Chicken Little.

Unbelievably, it’s become necessary to market music education to students, parents, administrators, school boards and policymakers. We need to “sell” them on music education.

“To sell well is to convince someone else to part with resources—
not to deprive that person, but to leave him better off in the end.”
—Daniel Pink, To Sell is Human

In marketing music education, we’re convincing students to part with their free time or to give up other activities. We ask them to devote energy to practice, rehearsals, and performance.

We’re convincing parents to part with cash, the time and gas to transport their child to lessons, rehearsals and performances; and furthermore, to assist the organization by volunteering and fundraising.

We’re convincing administrators to allocate time and the school board to allocate funding to music and arts classes during the school day.

We’re convincing policymakers at all levels that music education is not only worthwhile, but necessary. We’re communicating that music education prepares students not to become Grammy winning recording artists, but to be hardworking, productive, resourceful members of a cooperative society.

Luckily, there’s a lot of good news on the benefits of music education out there. The hard part is convincing people to take the attention and the time to share with those who need to hear it.

How can you sell music education today?