Category Archives: tips & tricks

More with Richard Crain of Midwest Clinic

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In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I continue my talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. We discuss why marching band is so big in Texas and why it’s so important for band directors to continue to hone their craft, plus the biggest lessons he’s learned over the course of his teaching career.

This is the second of two episodes with Richard Crain; find the first half of our conversation here! Continue reading

Make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile!

Are you missing this huge opportunity to let Facebook users know about your business?

If you haven’t set this up yet, take a few minutes to do it—you never know where your next customer will come from!

Here’s how to make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile:

Go to your personal Facebook profile, then click “About.” Under “Work and Education,” click on “Add a workplace.”

In the “Company” field, start typing the name of your business. If it has a Facebook page (and it ought to!), it should come up. Then fill in the rest of the details, make sure the privacy is set to “public,” and save changes.

When you’re done, people will be able to see and access your company’s Facebook page just by mousing over your name.

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

How to Spot a Phony Facebook Page

A video promoting a Tiffany ring giveaway has gone viral. It’s fake, though. Here’s how I can tell.

Here’s how you, too, can spot a phony Facebook page

1. The name of the page is slightly off.

Scammers will set up phony pages using names very similar to the ones used by the official Facebook page. In this case, Macy’s became Macys.com. The scammers eliminated the apostrophe, and tacked on a “.com.” Macy’s brand is bigger than its website, so the likelihood that the official page would use the “.com” is pretty low. Watch for slight spelling, capitalization, or punctuation differences.

2. There is no blue check mark indicating the page is verified by Facebook.

In response to these scammers, a few years ago Facebook started to verify pages for entities, usually large companies or celebrities, who were most likely to have their pages copied or cloned. If you’re not sure if a page is real, start typing the name of the page into Facebook’s search bar, and look for the blue checkmark. Here’s what you might see:

3. The giveaway is too good to be true.

Macy’s giving away priceless Tiffany jewelry? An alleged news page giving away pickup trucks and expensive makeup? Not likely. If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

4. The page was created recently.

As you can see in the right sidebar in the first image, the verified Macy’s Facebook page has a long history. The “Macys.com” page does not. And if you scroll to the bottom—trust me, it won’t take long—you’ll see that the page was created very recently (about 18 hours ago, in this case).

spot a phony Facebook page

Gold stars to Michelle and Jessy! ⭐️ ⭐️

Why would anyone set up a phony Facebook page?

Scammers set up these pages for various nefarious reasons. Sometimes they build up their popularity—often getting milliosn of likes—only to sell the page to the highest bidder, who can then change the name of the page and do with it as they please.

Or they might be using the page to scrape your identifying details to sell to a third party. By liking, sharing and commenting on the fake page, users have outed themselves as gullible, saving the scammers a step and making their lives easier. And yours a bit more difficult.

Scammers are banking on the fact that you’re too busy, overwhelmed and distracted to notice the differences between the fake Facebook page and the real deal. Take an extra second to check the details, and don’t give the scammers what they want.

Laura Blake WEB

Laura Blake, Events Manager of Music for All

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MME Laura Blake sq

About Laura Blake

Laura Blake WEBLaura Blake has been around the marching arts and Indianapolis area school bands since she was 6.  A trumpet player (and cable in percussion), she still plays each week in a community band and occasionally for local community theatre. Between 1998 and 2005, Laura worked with over 10 different Indiana school band programs, joining Music for All in 2005. She attended Butler University, but due to financial constraints, she left school one semester short of her bachelors degree. She expects to earn that degree this spring, thanks to the encouragement of Music for All CEO Eric Martin, and will begin her pursuit of a masters in non-profit management. An alumna of Kappa Kappa Psi, she serves on their Alumni Association Board.

MME laura blake twitter

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Tony Mazzocchi, author of The Music Parents’ Guide

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music parents guide cover art

About Tony Mazzocchi, author of The Music Parents Guide

music parents guide tony mazzocchiA GRAMMY® nominated music educator, Anthony Mazzocchi has performed as a trombonist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, New Jersey Symphony, San Diego Symphony, San Diego Opera, Riverside Symphony, Key West Symphony, in various Broadway shows and numerous recordings and movie soundtracks.

Tony has served as faculty or as a frequent guest lecturer at The Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, New York University, and Mannes College of Music.  He has taught students from kindergarten through college, and has served as a district Director of Fine and Performing Arts in the South Orange/Maplewood School District.  Tony has been a consultant for arts organizations throughout the NY/NJ area.

Tony is currently Associate Director of the John J. Cali School of Music at Montclair State University in New Jersey.  He is also Executive Director of theKinhaven Summer Music School in Weston, Vermont.  Tony is a clinician for Courtois – Paris.

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Gary Doherty, author of The Ignition Point

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Gary Doherty Ignition_PointGary Doherty is spearheading a conversation that is long overdue, particularly in the field of music education. We were introduced at Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic by mutual friend Cam Stasa (who gets an associate producer credit for this episode). After just a few moments with him, I knew that Gary Doherty could speak with authority on the importance of self-care and wellness for music educators (and volunteers!) as someone who had spent thirty years in the trenches of music ed and performance, and paid the price.

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practice slowly

Practice slowly to learn fast!

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If you want to learn something quickly, practice that thing S-L-O-W-L-Y. Because your brain is like a fresh snowdrift.

Obviously.

Listen to find out why musicians should practice slowly.

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MME Cam Stasa

Cam Stasa

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Cam Stasa is one of my favorite people on the planet. And if you’ve met her, as so many music educators have, I’d bet she’s one of yours, too.

In this conversation, we talk about:

  • her role at VanderCook College of Music in Chicago
  • how students and their families should approach applying to college
  • the unique way VanderCook prepares future music educators for the reality of today’s economy
  • the high burnout rate of music educators, and how to combat it
  • recruiting parent volunteers to save your sanity
  • the surprising fundraiser many programs are using
  • Cam’s reaction to the events of New Year’s Day Continue reading
Marc Whitt

Marc Whitt of the Association of Music Parents

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About Marc Whitt

Marc WhittFor 32 years, Marc Whitt has devoted his professional career to nonprofit public relations and marketing, and has long been an active advocate for education, economic development and the performing arts.

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Christopher Woodside NAfME MME

Christopher Woodside of NAfME

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I was thrilled to have a chance to speak with Christopher Woodside of the National Association for Music Education, otherwise known as NAfME. In a nutshell, he makes sure that everyone inside the Beltway knows how powerful music education is.

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