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PYMP DJ Corchin

DJ Corchin

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On this episode, I talk with DJ Corchin, also known as The 13th Chair Trombone Player. He’s a former band director turned prolific author whose works include poetry, children’s books, and even a musical. He’s just published the 3rd book in the Band Nerds series: Band Nerds Confessions and Confusion. He’s a regular columnist for both Marching.com and the Association of Music Parents.

Enter to win a digital iBooks copy of Band Nerds Confessions and Confusion!

band nerds confession confusion

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Courtney Brandt

Courtney Brandt: Young Adult Author

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On this episode of the Promoting Your Music Program podcast, I’m so excited to speak with  young adult novelist Courtney Brandt. You can find her books here:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

iBooks

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PYMP Erin Fortune volunteers

Erin Fortune of Music For All

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Erin Fortune

I was lucky enough to attend the Parent/Booster Institute at the Music for All Summer Symposium this year at Ball State University. I showed up a bit early, hoping to talk with a few of the people who make Music for All tick, and whose secrets we might steal to be able to apply to our own music programs.

Erin Fortune is the Senior Marketing Coordinator for Music for All. She spearheads a lot of their digital marketing efforts, so I knew she’d have some tips and tricks to share. Check out some of the highlights here, and find out how you can win a $30 gift card to Erin Condren to snap up one of Erin Fortune’s favorite products!

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diversify

Diversify your posts across social media

The other day I was on LinkedIn and came across this ad:

LI bad tip #7

At first glance, it seems like a really good idea. I mean, why not save the effort and energy, and post the same content across all of your social networks?

If you’re asking someone to put their trust in you enough to follow you on more than one social network, you should reward them by giving them killer content when they arrive. If you’ve posted the same thing across Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and G+, there’s no need for followers to follow you on more than one social network. They know they’ll get the same information by just following you on one.

Your efforts to diversify your content across social networks will pay off. “Arts and cultural organizations that tweet more than four times per day and do not replicate Facebook content on their Twitter feed have more followers and a higher rate of engagement than others.”

Plus, each network has different strengths. Images work great on Facebook or Pinterest. Links work well on Twitter or LinkedIn, but not at all on Instagram.

Sending one generic message out may not be the best use of your efforts.

Beyond that, it makes you and your business appear much less human. Would you rather answer a phone call and talk to your mother, or pick up the phone call to find a generic prerecorded message from your mom sent to you AND your siblings?

Not quite right, is it?

If you’re just starting out on social media, or maybe are short on time or energy, I suppose you can send a content blast across all of your networks (make sure you consider the time and effort involved in maintaining a presence on each network before you jump in with both feet). It’s better to be there and post regularly than not at all. But as you progress with your efforts to conquer the world of social media, start making small efforts to diversity your content streams. It’ll pay off in the end.

Diversity makes the world—online or off—a much more interesting place to be, don’t you think?

diversify