Category Archives: burnout

Wellness for Music Educators: Gary Doherty and Bruce Faske

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This episode explores the importance of wellness for music educators. A continuation of my earlier conversation with him, it seems Gary Doherty still has a few things to left to teach to former student Bruce Faske—and to the rest of us!

MME Gary Bruce MEwell

If you’re interested in joining us on our journey, or even just following along, check out the hashtag #MEwell.

 

William Gary Doherty

williamdohertyprimary1_thumbAn eclectic adventurer, William Gary Doherty brings a lifetime of Irish storytelling to everything he writes. With degrees in Music, Educational Administration and Educational Leadership Will brandishes a style of teaching that is provocative, creative, and utterly state of the art for the world in which we live. In addition to careers as a professional bassoonist and educator, Will is also a certified craft mixologist and wine specialist. His recent book, Wine 101 has been used by hospitality professionals to train staff, guests, and management in the basics of wine and slow-food hospitality. He has presented lectures and workshops for professionals in the United States, Central & South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. In The Ignition Point: Striking the Match, readers are introduced to the power of shaping one’s destiny by retaking individual responsibility for our personal, professional, and spiritual health.

 

Bruce Faske

bruce faskeBruce Faske is Artist Instructor of Trombone at Arkansas State University, where he teaches applied trombone lessons, conducts trombone choir, and performs with the Arkansas State Faculty Brass Quintet. He is also first trombone of the newly formed Diamond Brass Band of Northeast Arkansas, and second trombonist with the Missouri Symphony Orchestra in Columbia, MO. Prior to ASU, he served as Adjunct Instructor of Trombone and Euphonium at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, and maintained a large private trombone studio in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex. In addition to teaching in higher education, he is also interested in the development of younger trombonists, particularly the mastery of teaching beginner students in the first year of study. Faske has performed with numerous ensembles including the Dallas Opera, San Antonio Symphony, Tuscaloosa Symphony, Waco Symphony, the Lone Star Wind Orchestra, and fellowships with the Festival Institute at Round Top (2008) and the National Music Festival at Washington College in Chestertown, MD (2012). In 2011 and 2013, he was a Participant in the Alessi Seminar, a week long international workshop led by Joseph Alessi, Principal Trombonist of the New York Philharmonic.

Faske has given solo recitals at Ouachita Baptist University and Colorado State University, and has performed as soloist at the 45th Annual Festival of New Music at Ball State University, with the Southeastern Symphonic Winds at the 2014 Southeastern Oklahoma Band Directors Association Clinic, the University of Alabama Wind Ensemble at the 2013 Alabama All State Festival, the University of West Georgia Brass Ensemble, the Texas State University Concert Band, and numerous public school bands. In addition, he was a semi-finalist in the 2006 U.S. Army Band’s Eastern Trombone Workshop National Solo Competition. His teachers include Jonathan Whitaker, Brent Phillips, Jimmy Clark, John McCroskey, Joseph Cox, Don Lucas, and Larry Campbell. Bruce Faske is a proud Artist for the Edwards Instrument Company.

Wellness for Music Educators: On this episode…

0:04:40 Why Bruce teaches
0:06:30 How a healthy lifestyle makes Bruce a better educator
0:08:24 Gary: “Do less, do better.”
0:10:02 “We are just using athletes using highly developed fine motor skills.…everything I do that makes me a better athlete makes me a better performing artist.”
0:11:43 Gary: Music education programs at universities give only a “gratuitous nod” to wellness
0:13:10 Why Bruce’s new daily routine begins before he goes to bed
0:14:33 Bruce’s morning ritual
0:15:28 How Bruce handles busy days & recharges his batteries
0:17:24 How Bruce approached building new healthy habits
0:21:18 Gary: The importance of a SUSTAINABLE workout routine
0:22:47 The importance of marketing to yourself
0:24:37 Change your mornings, change your life
0:25:48 Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod
0:26:07 The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
0:26:45 Bruce’s biggest reward
0:30:09 Gary on self-compassion
0:30:42 Gary’s rewards for himself (Almond Dream)
0:34:20 Positive self-talk
0:39:42 Gary: Highlighting the positive in a performance setting
0:41:48 Adding a layer of wellness to university music education degrees
0:46:22 Bruce: Personally ask students how they’re doing
0:50:32 Practical tips: how to get started
0:51:05 The most important thing we have to face
0:53:33 Get outside
0:55:24 How to find Gary’s book
0:56:17 Bruce at the Missouri Symphony Orchestra
1:01:52 The fear kicks in
1:02:11 What happens when you have a big heart

 

Resources

Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod (affiliate link)

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
by Charles Duhigg (affiliate link)

ALMOND DREAM® Frozen Non-Dairy Desserts

How To Improve Self-Esteem: A New Secret From Research by Eric Barker

Split Image by Kate Fagan: the story of a collegiate athlete who committed suicide

Ignition Point: Striking the Match

Missouri Symphony Orchestra

Arkansas State University

FaskeMusic.com

Stand Up! app

What You Can When You Can: Healthy Living on Your Terms

Simple Green Smoothies (you HAVE to follow their Instagram account!)—their next 30 day challenge begins July 1!

Laura Blake WEB

Laura Blake, Events Manager of Music for All

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MME Laura Blake sq

About Laura Blake

Laura Blake WEBLaura Blake has been around the marching arts and Indianapolis area school bands since she was 6.  A trumpet player (and cable in percussion), she still plays each week in a community band and occasionally for local community theatre. Between 1998 and 2005, Laura worked with over 10 different Indiana school band programs, joining Music for All in 2005. She attended Butler University, but due to financial constraints, she left school one semester short of her bachelors degree. She expects to earn that degree this spring, thanks to the encouragement of Music for All CEO Eric Martin, and will begin her pursuit of a masters in non-profit management. An alumna of Kappa Kappa Psi, she serves on their Alumni Association Board.

MME laura blake twitter

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Tony Mazzocchi, author of The Music Parents’ Guide

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music parents guide cover art

About Tony Mazzocchi, author of The Music Parents Guide

music parents guide tony mazzocchiA GRAMMY® nominated music educator, Anthony Mazzocchi has performed as a trombonist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, New Jersey Symphony, San Diego Symphony, San Diego Opera, Riverside Symphony, Key West Symphony, in various Broadway shows and numerous recordings and movie soundtracks.

Tony has served as faculty or as a frequent guest lecturer at The Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, New York University, and Mannes College of Music.  He has taught students from kindergarten through college, and has served as a district Director of Fine and Performing Arts in the South Orange/Maplewood School District.  Tony has been a consultant for arts organizations throughout the NY/NJ area.

Tony is currently Associate Director of the John J. Cali School of Music at Montclair State University in New Jersey.  He is also Executive Director of theKinhaven Summer Music School in Weston, Vermont.  Tony is a clinician for Courtois – Paris.

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How NOT to Celebrate Music In Our Schools Month

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 bless your heart

Bless your heart.

The Texas Classroom Teachers’ Association TRIED to help celebrate Music In Our Schools month (MIOSM).

It just didn’t quite work.

Here is the story of the MIOSM Sax Fail of 2015.

 

The post

miosm sax no mouthpiece

Whoever was tasked with sourcing that image for MIOSM was clearly never a band kid. Nor was the either stock photography site, the photographer, nor the model.

For the record, the sax is missing its mouthpiece and neck strap altogether, and her hands are holding the instrument incorrectly.

Ouch.

A few people noticed, apparently, and down came the post.

TCTA apology screenshot clean

 

The response

Imgurians were largely amused.

Facebook took it more seriously. (Most of them, anyway.)

trumpasax comment

As you can see, some of the replies by teachers are borderline vitriolic. And really, it was a mistake that got fixed (arguably—some commenters feel that a new, correct image should be posted in support of Music in Our Schools month).

So why all the venom toward the Texas Classroom Teachers’ Association?

Perhaps it all boils down to disrespect.

Teaching, as a profession, is not well respected in our current political climate. Music educators are respected even less. Programs are getting slashed.

The unenlightened feel that music isn’t a “real” or an “important” school subject, that kids enrolled in music are “just having fun,” which of course they should be doing on their OWN time, not on the taxpayers’ dime.

Music educators have to fight these biases and misinformation EVERY DAY. And to have an organization—whose sole purpose is to support educators—post an image that propagates music education illiteracy? It’s too much.

It’s not fair that music education has to advocate so ardently for their existence, in a way that math or English never will. An image like this practically advocates AGAINST music education.

I think THAT’S why this makes music educators so mad. It makes a mockery of their life’s work.

 

How to avoid—or handle—a situation like this

As a social media manager, I’ve been in the same shoes as the unfortunate TCTA admin who created and originally posted the image. It’s not fun.

If you see something off about a social media post, privately message the account and let the admin know. They’ll be so grateful that you did. Try to be gracious about it—there’s enough hate on the internet already.

If you’re the one posting the offending content, time is of the essence. Where possible, react quickly and apologize.  Make it right to the best of your ability.

To TCTA’s credit, they’re not deleting negative comments. Deleting comments just escalates things. You look like you’re not willing to acknowledge your mistake, and commenters feel they’re not being heard. That makes them want to step up their efforts and let more people know not just about the original offense, but your disappointing response to it.

 For more on handling a social media meltdown, read this and this.

Mistakes happen. We can turn them into teachable moments, like the music educator who posted the unfortunate saxophone image on a bulletin board, and invited his students to find “What’s Wrong With This Picture?”

We’ll laugh about this one day, TCTA. I promise.

Jacksonville State University celebrates Music in Our Schools Month.

Jacksonville State University celebrates Music in Our Schools Month.

 

Want to sound off about this? I’d love to hear what you have to say!

 

miosm sax fail

Tim Hinton MME

Tim Hinton

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In this episode of Marketing Music Education, I speak with Tim Hinton. He is one of the hosts of the Marching Roundtable podcast, which I’ve listened to and enjoyed for years. Hi background as an educator is readily apparent, as he schools me about the benefits of hiring an arranger, the pitfalls of burnout, and the need to educate not just marching arts judges, but the entire marching arts community—and beyond!

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Gary Doherty, author of The Ignition Point

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Gary Doherty Ignition_PointGary Doherty is spearheading a conversation that is long overdue, particularly in the field of music education. We were introduced at Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic by mutual friend Cam Stasa (who gets an associate producer credit for this episode). After just a few moments with him, I knew that Gary Doherty could speak with authority on the importance of self-care and wellness for music educators (and volunteers!) as someone who had spent thirty years in the trenches of music ed and performance, and paid the price.

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PYMP Erin Fortune volunteers

Erin Fortune of Music For All

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Erin Fortune

I was lucky enough to attend the Parent/Booster Institute at the Music for All Summer Symposium this year at Ball State University. I showed up a bit early, hoping to talk with a few of the people who make Music for All tick, and whose secrets we might steal to be able to apply to our own music programs.

Erin Fortune is the Senior Marketing Coordinator for Music for All. She spearheads a lot of their digital marketing efforts, so I knew she’d have some tips and tricks to share. Check out some of the highlights here, and find out how you can win a $30 gift card to Erin Condren to snap up one of Erin Fortune’s favorite products!

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