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MME Army Field Band twitter

United States Army Field Band

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On this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I speak with Colonel Jim R. Keene, Master Sergeant Jason Stephens, and Staff Sergeant Heidi Ackerman of The United States Army Field Band. We discuss the group’s mission, where they fit in among the Army’s many other music ensembles, handling stress and burnout, and much more. In particular, we talk about their use of social media (especially live streaming) to achieve their goals, and how YOU can use it to achieve your music program’s goals!

Colonel Jim R. Keene

Army Field Band COL Jim R KeeneColonel Jim R. Keene became the Commander of The United States Army Field Band in January 2015. Prior to this assignment, he served as Commander of the United States Military Academy Band at West Point, New York; Commandant of the Army School of Music at Norfolk, Virginia; and at The United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” in Washington, DC, the U.S. Army Europe Band and Chorus in Heidelberg, Germany, and the Army Ground Forces Band in Atlanta, Georgia.

COL Keene has led numerous performances for international military and civilian leaders, dignitaries, and heads of state. During his time as Commander of the United States Military Academy Band at West Point, he led performances for the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty, co-directed the music for A&E’s and the National Park Service’s “A New Birth of Freedom” special for the 150th commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg, and a one-hour music special holiday production by the West Point Band aired on Fox News, “A West Point Holiday.” COL Keene led The U.S. Army Chorus in performances at the interments of former Presidents Ronald Reagan in Simi Valley, California, and Gerald R. Ford in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He has performed for seven U.S. presidents, at the 1996 Summer Olympic and Para-Olympic Games in Atlanta, the dedication of the National WWII Memorial, the one-year anniversary of 9/11 at the Pentagon, the “Kennedy Center Honors,” and the Military District of Washington’s production, “Spirit of America.” He has worked with the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra and Chorus and the National Symphony Orchestra, and has conducted the Dallas Wind Symphony, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic.

Prior to joining the Army, COL Keene served as Assistant Conductor of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Symphony, Orchestra Conductor at the SMU International Conservatory Summer Festival in Taos, New Mexico, and Music Director of the Albuquerque Civic Light Opera. He holds a Master of Music degree in Orchestral Conducting from the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University and a Bachelor of Music degree in Piano Performance from the University of New Mexico. He is a violinist, fiddler, pianist, accompanist, and songwriter, and is a native of Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Master Sergeant Jason Stephens

Army Field Band MSG Jason StephensMaster Sergeant Jason Stephens earned a Master of Arts degree from Florida State University and a Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of South Florida. He served in the 392nd Army Band. MSG Stephens has worked as a middle school band director, tuba player for Walt Disney World, and adjunct professor of Tuba at Troy State University. He currently serves as the Educational Activities Coordinator for The U.S. Army Field Band.

Staff Sergeant Heidi Ackerman

Army Field Band SSG Heidi AckermanStaff Sergeant Heidi Ackerman received a Master of Music degree from Arizona State University and a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Northwestern College in Orange City, Iowa. She debuted with the Phoenix Symphony in 2011 singing Mendelssohn’s “Elijah” and enjoyed three seasons as a professional chorister with Arizona Opera. Before joining The U.S. Army Field Band, SSG Ackerman sang with the Cantos de Taos at the Taos Opera Institute, conducted church and community choirs, taught junior high music, and sang professionally throughout the greater Phoenix area.

 

Links & resources mentioned in this episode with the United States Army Field Band

armyfieldband.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tusafb

http://www.youtube.com/USArmyFieldBand

http://www.facebook.com/FieldBand

http://www.facebook.com/jazzambassadors

http://www.facebook.com/armyrockband

http://twitter.com/fieldband

http://twitter.com/armyrockband

http://twitter.com/jazzambassadors

http://www.music.army.mil/

U.S. Army All-American Bowl

US Army Field Band All American MarchingBand-NoBackground-207x300

Military Band Funding

“If we really had a manning crisis, from my perspective, we would really tell people to put down the tuba and pick up a wrench or a gun.”
— Rep. Martha McSally, R-Ariz.

Articles

Congresswoman to Air Force: Put down the tuba, pick up a gun

Congresswoman calls for cuts to military music. by Anne Midgette

Politico: Gov’t Bands Face Chopping Block by College Marching

The Pentagon’s battle of the bands by Ellen Mitchell
Music in the military is a storied tradition, but some lawmakers say $437 million in yearly spending is too much.

U.S. HOUSE New National March: “The Stars and Stripes ForNever” by Daniel W. Boothe

NAfME Opposes McSally Amendment to Cut Military Band Funding

Petitions

Continue Military Bands Funding via We the People

Continue Military Bands Funding via Change.org

Make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile!

Are you missing this huge opportunity to let Facebook users know about your business?

If you haven’t set this up yet, take a few minutes to do it—you never know where your next customer will come from!

Here’s how to make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile:

Go to your personal Facebook profile, then click “About.” Under “Work and Education,” click on “Add a workplace.”

In the “Company” field, start typing the name of your business. If it has a Facebook page (and it ought to!), it should come up. Then fill in the rest of the details, make sure the privacy is set to “public,” and save changes.

When you’re done, people will be able to see and access your company’s Facebook page just by mousing over your name.

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

How to Spot a Phony Facebook Page

A video promoting a Tiffany ring giveaway has gone viral. It’s fake, though. Here’s how I can tell.

Here’s how you, too, can spot a phony Facebook page

1. The name of the page is slightly off.

Scammers will set up phony pages using names very similar to the ones used by the official Facebook page. In this case, Macy’s became Macys.com. The scammers eliminated the apostrophe, and tacked on a “.com.” Macy’s brand is bigger than its website, so the likelihood that the official page would use the “.com” is pretty low. Watch for slight spelling, capitalization, or punctuation differences.

2. There is no blue check mark indicating the page is verified by Facebook.

In response to these scammers, a few years ago Facebook started to verify pages for entities, usually large companies or celebrities, who were most likely to have their pages copied or cloned. If you’re not sure if a page is real, start typing the name of the page into Facebook’s search bar, and look for the blue checkmark. Here’s what you might see:

3. The giveaway is too good to be true.

Macy’s giving away priceless Tiffany jewelry? An alleged news page giving away pickup trucks and expensive makeup? Not likely. If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

4. The page was created recently.

As you can see in the right sidebar in the first image, the verified Macy’s Facebook page has a long history. The “Macys.com” page does not. And if you scroll to the bottom—trust me, it won’t take long—you’ll see that the page was created very recently (about 18 hours ago, in this case).

spot a phony Facebook page

Gold stars to Michelle and Jessy! ⭐️ ⭐️

Why would anyone set up a phony Facebook page?

Scammers set up these pages for various nefarious reasons. Sometimes they build up their popularity—often getting milliosn of likes—only to sell the page to the highest bidder, who can then change the name of the page and do with it as they please.

Or they might be using the page to scrape your identifying details to sell to a third party. By liking, sharing and commenting on the fake page, users have outed themselves as gullible, saving the scammers a step and making their lives easier. And yours a bit more difficult.

Scammers are banking on the fact that you’re too busy, overwhelmed and distracted to notice the differences between the fake Facebook page and the real deal. Take an extra second to check the details, and don’t give the scammers what they want.

Norwin area local businesses doing permission marketing right

Sales and marketing have changed.

Gone are the days when advertisers could broadcast their ad via the newspaper, radio and TV to a captive audience. Now, consumers have choices. A LOT of choices. Rather than endure an ad that doesn’t interest them, they can turn the page, change the channel, or click away.

So you’ve got to capture your target market’s attention. No easy feat in 2015, for sure.

What better way to do that than to GIVE your prospects something they value?

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IFTTT Instagram to Twitter

Why Can’t I See Instagram Photos on Twitter? Can I Fix That?

Instagram and Twitter used to play nicely together. Not so much anymore.

When you share to Twitter from Instagram, your post contains a URL back to Instagram. Users have to click through to see your image. And data shows that they’re NOT bothering to do that. As a matter of fact, they’re going out of their way not to click on that link. Continue reading

How NOT to Celebrate Music In Our Schools Month

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 bless your heart

Bless your heart.

The Texas Classroom Teachers’ Association TRIED to help celebrate Music In Our Schools month (MIOSM).

It just didn’t quite work.

Here is the story of the MIOSM Sax Fail of 2015.

 

The post

miosm sax no mouthpiece

Whoever was tasked with sourcing that image for MIOSM was clearly never a band kid. Nor was the either stock photography site, the photographer, nor the model.

For the record, the sax is missing its mouthpiece and neck strap altogether, and her hands are holding the instrument incorrectly.

Ouch.

A few people noticed, apparently, and down came the post.

TCTA apology screenshot clean

 

The response

Imgurians were largely amused.

Facebook took it more seriously. (Most of them, anyway.)

trumpasax comment

As you can see, some of the replies by teachers are borderline vitriolic. And really, it was a mistake that got fixed (arguably—some commenters feel that a new, correct image should be posted in support of Music in Our Schools month).

So why all the venom toward the Texas Classroom Teachers’ Association?

Perhaps it all boils down to disrespect.

Teaching, as a profession, is not well respected in our current political climate. Music educators are respected even less. Programs are getting slashed.

The unenlightened feel that music isn’t a “real” or an “important” school subject, that kids enrolled in music are “just having fun,” which of course they should be doing on their OWN time, not on the taxpayers’ dime.

Music educators have to fight these biases and misinformation EVERY DAY. And to have an organization—whose sole purpose is to support educators—post an image that propagates music education illiteracy? It’s too much.

It’s not fair that music education has to advocate so ardently for their existence, in a way that math or English never will. An image like this practically advocates AGAINST music education.

I think THAT’S why this makes music educators so mad. It makes a mockery of their life’s work.

 

How to avoid—or handle—a situation like this

As a social media manager, I’ve been in the same shoes as the unfortunate TCTA admin who created and originally posted the image. It’s not fun.

If you see something off about a social media post, privately message the account and let the admin know. They’ll be so grateful that you did. Try to be gracious about it—there’s enough hate on the internet already.

If you’re the one posting the offending content, time is of the essence. Where possible, react quickly and apologize.  Make it right to the best of your ability.

To TCTA’s credit, they’re not deleting negative comments. Deleting comments just escalates things. You look like you’re not willing to acknowledge your mistake, and commenters feel they’re not being heard. That makes them want to step up their efforts and let more people know not just about the original offense, but your disappointing response to it.

 For more on handling a social media meltdown, read this and this.

Mistakes happen. We can turn them into teachable moments, like the music educator who posted the unfortunate saxophone image on a bulletin board, and invited his students to find “What’s Wrong With This Picture?”

We’ll laugh about this one day, TCTA. I promise.

Jacksonville State University celebrates Music in Our Schools Month.

Jacksonville State University celebrates Music in Our Schools Month.

 

Want to sound off about this? I’d love to hear what you have to say!

 

miosm sax fail

#MIOSM Instagram Challenge

March is Music In Our Schools month!

Let’s celebrate with the National Association for Music Education. They’re celebrating 30 years of MIOSM this year!

So remember how I’m always going on about “marketing music education?” MIOSM is a wonderful reminder to do that. And it’s much better than mourning Music NOT In Our Schools Month.

It’s so easy. Here’s how:

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How’s your customer buying process? Optimize your social profiles and website

I was cruising Facebook not long ago, and came across this. It made me stop and think about a typical customer buying process.

ice cream hours aatna

A few thoughts:

  1. She wants to buy from a small local business? Cool!
  2. He called to find out their hours for her? That’s really kind!
  3. Their Facebook page didn’t list the hours for BOTH locations?!?
  4. Their website doesn’t list the hours, either?
  5. They didn’t even mention National Ice Cream Day in a Facebook post? THAT’S a missed opportunity.

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Asked and Answered

How to search a Facebook group

Yes, there IS a way to search a Facebook group! Watch this video to find out how.

Keep in mind, Facebook’s search algorithm is better than it used to be, but still not comprehensive. I often go looking for a post I know exists in the group, yet the search results fail to turn it up.

If you’re looking to search elsewhere on Facebook, this post by Make Use Of offers 5 Tools To Help You Find Anything In Your Facebook Timeline.

 

Christopher Woodside NAfME MME

Christopher Woodside of NAfME

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I was thrilled to have a chance to speak with Christopher Woodside of the National Association for Music Education, otherwise known as NAfME. In a nutshell, he makes sure that everyone inside the Beltway knows how powerful music education is.

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