Jeff Grogan, 2017 MFA Honor Orchestra of America conductor

Play
Jeff Grogan

Photo credit Fred Stucker

Read the full article about Jeff Grogan I wrote for the Music for All Orchestra America Newsletter here. Learn more about the Orchestra America National Festival here, and how students can apply to work with Jeff Grogan as a member of the 2017 Honor Orchestra of America here.

Don’t forget: subscribe here on Google Playhere on iTunes, or here on Stitcher to get each episode as soon as it’s available!

Jeff Grogan serves as conductor and artistic director of the InterSchool Orchestras of New York as well as the Greater Newark Youth Orchestras and music director and conductor of the New Jersey Youth Symphony. He is in his sixth season as the education and community engagement conductor for the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, where he leads the NJSO in a variety of concerts each season.

In addition, he spends a large portion of each season working with school music programs, festivals, and conducting All State Orchestras throughout the country. Prior to his appointment with the NJSO, Grogan was director of orchestras and associate professor at the Ithaca College School of Music. Grogan was previously on faculty at the University of Michigan and Baylor University. He taught public school in the Desoto (Texas) Independent School District. Grogan is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University and the University of Michigan.

 

Resources from my conversation with Jeff Grogan

InterSchool Orchestras of New York

Greater Newark Youth Orchestras

New Jersey Youth Symphony

Orchestra You at the New Jersey Symphony

NPR’s coverage of Orchestra You

Get Some Grit podcast with Bruce Faske:
Episode 16 – Spring Break? Or Spring Repair?

John Gallagher NYSSMA

Dr. John Gallagher of NYSSMA

Play

I first found Dr. John Gallagher and NYSSMA on Twitter a couple of years ago. They linked to something called a “Swiss cheese” press release. I clicked the link and found not only a treasure trove of templates for public relations—all tailored specifically for music education programs—but tumbled down a deep rabbit hole of online resources all designed to help you market music education right in your own community.

I’m so glad John was able to join me on the podcast! Here are a few of the topics we touch on in this episode:

  • What is a “Swiss Cheese” news release?
  • What’s the best way to advocate for your program?
  • The importance of engaging your community
  • How to get your music program covered by local news outlets
  • Lessons from failed attempts to organize a booster group
  • The legality of using students’ images to promote your music program
  • Great advice from a retired superintendent to battle burnout
  • A few “out-of-the-box” fundraiser ideas
  • The one thing that John says will improve your music program

 

John Gallagher NYSSMA perform

 

Resources from this episode

NYSSMA Swiss cheese news releases

NYSSMA on Twitter

Email Dr. Gallagher

Why Music? PSAs for Music in Our Schools Month from NAfME

Continue reading

how to get rid of earworms

How to Get Rid of Earworms

Wondering how to get rid of earworms?

Don’t you hate when there’s a song stuck in your head? The phenomenon is nothing new. Mozart used to be plagued by it, often infected by his own children! Mashable says the scientific name is “involuntary musical imagery,” abbreviated to INMI. You can also call it “stuck-song syndrome.” Thanks to this guy, America settled on a better word to describe it. Everybody gets earworms, though musicians and women are somewhat more prone to them. So now that we have a handle on them, here’s how to get rid of earworms.

Grab some gum.

David DeSalvo of Forbes describes how and why a stick of chewing gum can help clear your head of musical distractions. Go read the whole piece, but this is it in a nutshell:

“…We’re all well aware that trying to not think about the song guarantees that it won’t stop playing. The harder you try, the more persistent it becomes. Chewing gum (or chewing anything else that’s sufficiently chewy) doesn’t offer an enhanced thinking solution; it simply takes over the same cerebral rails the song was running along.”

Read the original research here.

One test subject mentioned that chewing on a cinnamon stick also worked, but I’d sure as heck rather chew gum.

hot to get rid of earworms gum

Distract yourself like Goldilocks.

If that doesn’t work, try to distract yourself. Try a puzzle like an anagram, or stick your nose in a novel.

“The key is to find something that will give the right level of challenge,” said Dr Ira Hyman, a music psychologist at Western Washington University who conducted the research. “If you are cognitively engaged, it limits the ability of intrusive songs to enter your head.…

“Likewise, if you are trying something too hard, then your brain will not be engaged successfully, so that music can come back. You need to find that bit in the middle where there is not much space left in the brain. That will be different for each individual.

“It is like a Goldilocks effect – it can’t be too easy and it can’t be too hard, it has got to be just right.”

Just erase it.

Try an “eraser song.” Pick a different song to replace your current earworm. Hopefully it’ll be less sticky.

 

Go whole hog.

Still suffering? Maybe try the hair of the dog that bit you. Listen to the WHOLE song. It doesn’t always work, but it’s worth a shot.

 

Spread the infection.

This seems kind of mean to me, but maybe you know someone who’s got it coming. Sharing the song in your head makes it more likely to dissipate. For YOU, anyway.

 

If needed, apply more than one strategy.

Dr. David Ley suggests listening to the entire song, paying it your full attention. Then cognitively distract yourself by doing something else. Follow that up with listening to a song that you link AND know well.

Stay away from these tunes.

Kylie Minogue, Can’t Get You Out of My Head

James Blunt, You’re Beautiful

Baha Men, Who Let the Dogs Out

Mission Impossible theme

Village People, YMCA

Happy Days theme

Corinne Bailey Rae, Put Your Records On

Suzanne Vega, Tom’s Diner

Tight Fit, The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Tiffany, I Think We’re Alone Now

Just out of curiosity, what song is stuck in your head, anyway? And when your friends ask how to get rid of earworms, which method will you recommend?

 

MFA Middle School Band Camp

Play

MFA MS band campIn this episode, I speak with Greg Scapillato and Keith Ozsvath. They’re the coordinators of the brand new MFA middle school track at the 2016 Music For All Summer Symposium.

We’ll talk about how Keith and Greg met and where their careers have taken them. We discuss the challenges they face as middle school band directors, like recruiting, retention and burnout. They also share why they saw a need for a camp like the MFA middle school camp, as well as their approach to designing the event from scratch.

To learn more, listen in. Then click here to sign up to get more information as it’s available, and check out this feature article here.

http://musicforall.org/mscamp

Band Directors Facebook Group

 

About this week’s guests


keith ozsvath headshotKeith Ozsvath
is passionate about teaching music, professional development, and integrating technology. He joined the music faculty at Rotolo Middle School in Batavia, Illinois, in 2000 and teaches the 8th Grade Band, Jazz Ensemble, and the Symphonic Band. Mr. Ozsvath is an active adjudicator and clinician in the Chicago area. He is a member of the American School Band Directors Association, National Association for Music Education, been recognized twice by “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers” and is an Eagle Scout. He has been an Illinois Summer Youth Music conductor at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. Additionally, he has presented sessions at the National Middle School Association Conference, Illinois Music Educators All-State Conference, and at VanderCook College of Music. Keith currently teaches two VanderCook MECA classes: Tech Tools for the Music Educator and an online class, You Made This! Website Design & Creation for Music Educators. Mr. Ozsvath also authors a blog, www.teachingbandandmore.com, which provides practical teaching ideas for music educators.

 

greg scapillato sq cropGreg Scapillato teaches band in Northbrook District 28 (IL), conducting the Wind Ensemble and teaching lessons grades 4-8. Mr. Scapillato strives to create meaningful musical experiences for students in his care. While teaching the Beginning Band, he introduced a demonstration concert designed to improve parent investment and engagement. The NBJH Wind Ensemble, under Mr. Scapillato’s direction, has benefitted from special performance opportunities, including joint concerts with professional ensembles and service-based performances such as the local Veterans’ Day Ceremony. Mr. Scapillato also initiated a biennial alumni concert to connect students to those with a life-long love of music performance. In addition to music-related pursuits, Mr. Scapillato enjoys developing his expertise with technology and its integration to accelerate student learning. Success is not a solo adventure: Mr. Scapillato is grateful for supportive colleagues, friends, and family. He calls Arlington Heights, Illinois, home with his wife, son, and an incorrigible Golden Retriever.

More with Richard Crain of Midwest Clinic

Play

In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I continue my talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. We discuss why marching band is so big in Texas and why it’s so important for band directors to continue to hone their craft, plus the biggest lessons he’s learned over the course of his teaching career.

This is the second of two episodes with Richard Crain; find the first half of our conversation here! Continue reading

MME Richard Crain twitter

Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic

Play

In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. He gives us an overview of the event, including who should attend and what to expect. We discuss the importance of professional development for music educators, especially as it relates to burnout and teacher turnover. We discuss his experience with volunteers, fundraising, and what he feels the most important discipline in the entire curriculum might be (hint: it’s music!)

This is the first of two episodes with Richard Crain; be sure to tune in next time for more! Continue reading

MME Eric Martin 2

Eric Martin, CEO of Music for All: Part 2

Play

This episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast is the second half of my conversation with Eric Martin of Music for All. Listen to part 1 here.

In the second installment, we discuss Music for All’s ticket pricing, and how Eric and his team strive to deliver a “‘Disney-like’ experience on a Mickey Mouse budget.” We cover how local music programs can implement ideas from Music for All and other sources, and how to tell if you’re stealing an idea, or just researching it. We discuss Eric’s leadership style and talk about who’s influenced him. We delve into funding for music education, including fundraising and sponsorship, and go deeper into the importance of music education advocacy at the local level. Finally, Eric shares the advice he’d give the parent of a potential incoming music student, the advice he’d give your music program, and the very best way he knows how to market music education. Continue reading

Eric Martin MFA MME

Eric Martin, CEO of Music for All: Part 1

Play

In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I sat down with Eric Martin of Music for All. He’s one of my favorite people to talk to, and we covered a lot: enough for two episodes! Listen to the second episode here.

In this first installment, we talk about his experience as an African-American band student in a recently desegregated school, his love of the marching arts, his background as an aviation lawyer and how he got into event production. We also discuss the importance of music education and the power of music—and live events—in our society, and why Sarah Palin is a role model of his. We also touch on burnout and its effects not just on music educators, but on nonprofit staffers like those at Music for All and like the parent volunteers that power music programs like yours. Continue reading

Listener Survey: Fall 2015

Play

In this episode, I share what I learned from the recent Marketing Music Education listener survey. Plus I talk about the accident at the Foothills Invitational Marching Band Competition on October 3, 2015, at North Iredell High School near Charlotte, NC.

Links and Resources from this episode

South Iredell band returns to the field following tragedy

Driver cited in wreck that injured students at North Iredell High

Contribute to the SIHS Band Medical Fund on GoFundMe.

An Open Letter to All Boards of Education About the Power of Music and the Arts in Schools by Tony Mazzocchi of Music Parents Guide. Hear his conversation with me here.

Deputy Sheriff A.J. Mendez plays with the Poteet High School Band at the football game in D’Hanis.

Make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile!

Are you missing this huge opportunity to let Facebook users know about your business?

If you haven’t set this up yet, take a few minutes to do it—you never know where your next customer will come from!

Here’s how to make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile:

Go to your personal Facebook profile, then click “About.” Under “Work and Education,” click on “Add a workplace.”

In the “Company” field, start typing the name of your business. If it has a Facebook page (and it ought to!), it should come up. Then fill in the rest of the details, make sure the privacy is set to “public,” and save changes.

When you’re done, people will be able to see and access your company’s Facebook page just by mousing over your name.

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

Facebook page appears on your personal profile