More with Richard Crain of Midwest Clinic


In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I continue my talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. We discuss why marching band is so big in Texas and why it’s so important for band directors to continue to hone their craft, plus the biggest lessons he’s learned over the course of his teaching career.

This is the second of two episodes with Richard Crain; find the first half of our conversation here! Continue reading

MME Richard Crain twitter

Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic


In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. He gives us an overview of the event, including who should attend and what to expect. We discuss the importance of professional development for music educators, especially as it relates to burnout and teacher turnover. We discuss his experience with volunteers, fundraising, and what he feels the most important discipline in the entire curriculum might be (hint: it’s music!)

This is the first of two episodes with Richard Crain; be sure to tune in next time for more! Continue reading

MME Eric Martin 2

Eric Martin, CEO of Music for All: Part 2


This episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast is the second half of my conversation with Eric Martin of Music for All. Listen to part 1 here.

In the second installment, we discuss Music for All’s ticket pricing, and how Eric and his team strive to deliver a “‘Disney-like’ experience on a Mickey Mouse budget.” We cover how local music programs can implement ideas from Music for All and other sources, and how to tell if you’re stealing an idea, or just researching it. We discuss Eric’s leadership style and talk about who’s influenced him. We delve into funding for music education, including fundraising and sponsorship, and go deeper into the importance of music education advocacy at the local level. Finally, Eric shares the advice he’d give the parent of a potential incoming music student, the advice he’d give your music program, and the very best way he knows how to market music education. Continue reading

Eric Martin MFA MME

Eric Martin, CEO of Music for All: Part 1


In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I sat down with Eric Martin of Music for All. He’s one of my favorite people to talk to, and we covered a lot: enough for two episodes! Listen to the second episode here.

In this first installment, we talk about his experience as an African-American band student in a recently desegregated school, his love of the marching arts, his background as an aviation lawyer and how he got into event production. We also discuss the importance of music education and the power of music—and live events—in our society, and why Sarah Palin is a role model of his. We also touch on burnout and its effects not just on music educators, but on nonprofit staffers like those at Music for All and like the parent volunteers that power music programs like yours. Continue reading

Listener Survey: Fall 2015


In this episode, I share what I learned from the recent Marketing Music Education listener survey. Plus I talk about the accident at the Foothills Invitational Marching Band Competition on October 3, 2015, at North Iredell High School near Charlotte, NC.

Links and Resources from this episode

South Iredell band returns to the field following tragedy

Driver cited in wreck that injured students at North Iredell High

Contribute to the SIHS Band Medical Fund on GoFundMe.

An Open Letter to All Boards of Education About the Power of Music and the Arts in Schools by Tony Mazzocchi of Music Parents Guide. Hear his conversation with me here.

Deputy Sheriff A.J. Mendez plays with the Poteet High School Band at the football game in D’Hanis.

Make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile!

Are you missing this huge opportunity to let Facebook users know about your business?

If you haven’t set this up yet, take a few minutes to do it—you never know where your next customer will come from!

Here’s how to make sure your Facebook page appears on your personal profile:

Go to your personal Facebook profile, then click “About.” Under “Work and Education,” click on “Add a workplace.”

In the “Company” field, start typing the name of your business. If it has a Facebook page (and it ought to!), it should come up. Then fill in the rest of the details, make sure the privacy is set to “public,” and save changes.

When you’re done, people will be able to see and access your company’s Facebook page just by mousing over your name.

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

Facebook page appears on your personal profile

MME Donna Schwartz 2

Donna Schwartz, part 2


donna schwartzThis week I continue my conversation with Donna Schwartz of Music Teachers’ Resource Guide. We talk about her two masters degrees and whether she’d do it all again, why she believes music education in our schools is so vulnerable, and her two biggest goals.

Continue reading

How to Spot a Phony Facebook Page

A video promoting a Tiffany ring giveaway has gone viral. It’s fake, though. Here’s how I can tell.

Here’s how you, too, can spot a phony Facebook page

1. The name of the page is slightly off.

Scammers will set up phony pages using names very similar to the ones used by the official Facebook page. In this case, Macy’s became The scammers eliminated the apostrophe, and tacked on a “.com.” Macy’s brand is bigger than its website, so the likelihood that the official page would use the “.com” is pretty low. Watch for slight spelling, capitalization, or punctuation differences.

2. There is no blue check mark indicating the page is verified by Facebook.

In response to these scammers, a few years ago Facebook started to verify pages for entities, usually large companies or celebrities, who were most likely to have their pages copied or cloned. If you’re not sure if a page is real, start typing the name of the page into Facebook’s search bar, and look for the blue checkmark. Here’s what you might see:

3. The giveaway is too good to be true.

Macy’s giving away priceless Tiffany jewelry? An alleged news page giving away pickup trucks and expensive makeup? Not likely. If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

4. The page was created recently.

As you can see in the right sidebar in the first image, the verified Macy’s Facebook page has a long history. The “” page does not. And if you scroll to the bottom—trust me, it won’t take long—you’ll see that the page was created very recently (about 18 hours ago, in this case).

spot a phony Facebook page

Gold stars to Michelle and Jessy! ⭐️ ⭐️

Why would anyone set up a phony Facebook page?

Scammers set up these pages for various nefarious reasons. Sometimes they build up their popularity—often getting milliosn of likes—only to sell the page to the highest bidder, who can then change the name of the page and do with it as they please.

Or they might be using the page to scrape your identifying details to sell to a third party. By liking, sharing and commenting on the fake page, users have outed themselves as gullible, saving the scammers a step and making their lives easier. And yours a bit more difficult.

Scammers are banking on the fact that you’re too busy, overwhelmed and distracted to notice the differences between the fake Facebook page and the real deal. Take an extra second to check the details, and don’t give the scammers what they want.

Donna Schwartz

Donna Schwartz, part 1


donna schwartzDonna Schwartz of Music Teachers’ Resource Guide joined me for a great, passionate conversation about the importance of music education. In this episode, we cover:

  • How Donna got into music education
  • Why she got out of music education, and how her side trip helped her
  • Why Donna left New York for California
  • Why this music educator will never stop educating herself
  • How students learn music, and why and how they should learn it differently
  • How learning music is like learning a foreign language

Be sure to listen to the second part of our conversation here!

Continue reading

MME Joe Beard Twitter part 2

Joe Beard: The Marching Podcast (part 2)

Joe Beard of The Marching Podcast joins me on this show, the second in a two-part series. His podcast (which you should go download!) focuses on the marching arts within the world of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. In this episode, we talk about some of the things you learn in marching band that have nothing to do with music, circle BACK to the political brouhaha that was marriage equality in Indiana, where to find videos of awesome HBCU bands, how to get people excited about band, and why music education makes a difference even if you have no plans to continue professionally.
Be sure to listen in to part one of our conversation here!

Continue reading